ANZ

Australia’s climate change laggard

ANZ

Australia’s climate change laggard

$0 billion
loaned to dirty fossil fuels globally since 2016

Since committing to support the Paris Agreement in 2015, ANZ has loaned more than $10 billion to fossil fuels around the world. This includes $2.4 billion to the coal industry, more than any other Australian bank.

Worse still, our latest research found ANZ loaned $2.2 billion for projects that expand the scale of the fossil fuel industry, just when we need a rapid decline of fossil fuels to keep global warming to 1.5°C. These projects will enable the release of over 4 billion tonnes of CO2, equivalent to more than seven times Australia’s total greenhouse gas emissions in calendar year 2019.

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Take action: tell ANZ that its Paris Agreement pledge means no more fossil fuels!



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Has ANZ fulfilled its Paris Agreement commitments?

In late 2015, ANZ publicly committed to taking action to support the Paris Agreement, which includes the goal of limiting global warming to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. But as our scorecard shows, ANZ’s actions brazenly flout that pledge.

Since January 2016, ANZ has loaned over $1.9 billion to large companies whose business plans are consistent with the failure of the Paris Agreement, more than any other Australian bank. Over the same timeframe ANZ was also the biggest Australian lender to the coal industry, lending more than $2.4 billion. This includes a loan to New Hope Coal for construction of a new and highly controversial thermal coal mining project; New Acland Stage 3. As if that wasn’t bad enough, for every dollar ANZ loaned to renewable energy it loaned almost $5.50 to fossil fuels, far worse than any other Australian bank.

Not only does ANZ have a terrible track record of funding dirty energy, it also has arguably the weakest climate and energy policy of the major banks. Unlike every other big four bank, ANZ has not committed to phase out thermal coal and its current commitments allow it to continue lending to, and remain invested in, most types of coal and the vast majority of fossil fuel companies and projects.

The 1.5°C warming limit has stark implications for the world’s energy system meaning we cannot accommodate any new or expanded fossil fuel projects, including supply (coal mines and oil & gas reserves) and power plants.

What does this mean for ANZ? An obvious start would be a policy excluding any new investments that expand the fossil fuel industry, and to exit thermal coal no later than 2030, consistent with the Paris Agreement. Beyond this, the bank must commit to actively managing down its exposure to oil and gas in line with meeting the uppermost goals of the Paris Agreement.

Find out more about our big banks campaign.

Scorecard since Paris Agreement commitment:

  • total lending to fossil fuels
  • $0 million
  • lending to companies with business plans consistent with the failure of Paris Agreement
  • $0 million
  • Total lending to expansionary projects
  • $0 million
  • fossil fuel vs renewables lending ratio
  • $5.49 : $1

  • Total emissions enabled
    (tonnes CO2)
  • 4.1 billion

  • Plans to exit thermal coal by 2030, consistent with Paris Agreement?
  • No

  • Plans to phase out all fossil fuel exposure in line with the Paris Agreement?
  • No

  • Explicitly rules out funding new or expansionary fossil fuels?
  • No

  • Explicitly rules out funding companies whose business plans are consistent with the failure of the Paris Agreement?
  • No

How is ANZ expanding fossil fuels?

Despite its commitment to the Paris Agreement, ANZ continues to fund companies and projects hell-bent on expanding fossil fuels. Examples include:

  • Nov 2019: loaned US$174 million for the Refinery And Petrochemical Integrated Development (RAPID) project in Malaysia, capable of producing more than 200,000 barrels per day of liquid fossil fuel products including petrol, diesel, jet fuel and fuel oil. Market Forces estimates RAPID would enable the release of 583 million tonnes of CO2 over its lifetime, more than all of Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions in calendar year 2019.
  • Feb 2018 & Jul 2019: loaned $100 million to Fitzroy Australia Resources across two separate deals in Feb 2018 and Jul 2019, for its Carborough Downs coal mine in central Queensland. In June 2018, Fitzroy’s CEO Grant Polwarth told industry media “we have now mined in excess of 2 million tonnes of resource that was never previously contemplated while opening up the northern reserves and creating a 10 plus year future”.
  • Dec 2018: contributed to a $600 million loan to New Hope to develop the proposed New Acland Stage 3 coal mine in south-east Queensland, unlocking another 80.4 million tonnes of thermal coal. The project would extend the life of the established New Acland coal mine beyond 2030, when OECD countries like Australia need to exit thermal coal if we’re to align with the Paris Agreement’s climate goals.
  • 2016 & 2017: loaned US$440 million across three deals to finance one of Australia’s largest liquefied natural gas (LNG) projects. Market Forces estimates that over its lifetime, Ichthys would enable the release of 1.1 billion tonnes of CO2, double Australia’s 2019 greenhouse gas emissions.
Expansionary fossil fuel projects funded by ANZ since 1 Jan 2016

ANZ’s funding of expansionary fossil fuel projects since 1 Jan 2016

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